Pregnancy

How to Reduce Swelling in Feet During Pregnancy

Team Peanut
Team Peanutlast month4 min read

Looking for tips on how to reduce swelling in feet during pregnancy? We’ve got great ways to give your hands and feet some much-needed relief.

How to Reduce Swelling in Feet During Pregnancy

Sigh.

They were functional, ordinary-looking feet once, but now that you’re pregnant, they’ve been replaced with awkward, puffy bags of lead that don’t fit into any of your shoes. 😭











Ah, the joys of pregnancy.

If you’re experiencing swollen feet, ankles, legs, and fingers — especially towards the end of the day and as you get further into your pregnancy — you’re not alone, mama.

It’s a very common symptom that almost no one escapes.

But how do you treat it?

If you’re looking for tips on how to reduce swelling in feet during pregnancy, sit back and relax.

We’ve got you.

In this article: 📝

  • Tips on how to reduce swelling in hands and feet during pregnancy
  • Does ice help pregnancy swelling?
  • Should I walk if my feet are swollen during pregnancy?
  • When should I be concerned by swelling in my feet during pregnancy?

Tips on how to reduce swelling in hands and feet during pregnancy

So, what practical things can you do to make the swelling in your feet and hands go down during pregnancy?

Let’s take a look.

1. Eat less salt

It’s a pretty good idea to limit your salt while you’re pregnant anyway since it can raise your blood pressure.

But if you’re fighting swollen feet, be even more conscious about your salt intake.

It can make your body retain water.

An alternative?

Try sprinkling fresh or dried herbs over your food to add extra flavor.

2. Stay hydrated

Can drinking water make you swell less?

Strangely, yes.

If you’re dehydrated, your body will likely hold on to the little fluid it has, which can worsen your swelling.

Try and aim for eight to twelve glasses of water a day.

3. Take it easy

Particularly if you’re heading into your third trimester, you may seriously be feeling the need to be on a go-slow.

While you’re resting, elevate your feet a little, ideally above your heart.

This simple movement can help to drain the fluid that’s been collecting in your feet.

4. Wear compression socks

We know — compression socks will never make it onto the list of Sexiest Clothing of All Time.

But if you’re OK with temporarily trading couture for comfort, they can help to keep the fluid in your feet and legs circulating.

5. Go shoe shopping

Yep, you heard us.

We (and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) officially give you permission to go shoe shopping.

The brief is pretty specific, though:

You’re looking for a couple of pairs of low-heeled shoes that aren’t totally flat and offer good arch support.

Athletic shoes are a good option.

(Sorry, mama, that beautiful heels will have to wait a while for their turn.)

Does ice help pregnancy swelling?

Cold compresses are a great way to soothe and remedy your swollen feet.

Submerging your feet in cool water for 20 minutes every few days can help too.

Be wary of ice-cold temperatures, though.

If the water you use is too cold, or you use too many blocks of ice, you might reduce the blood flow in your feet and cause more swelling.

Stick to temperatures that feel comfortable for you.

Should I walk if my feet are swollen during pregnancy?

Some light exercise might feel counterintuitive if your feet feel like they’re the size of watermelons.

But taking regular walks can help to improve circulation and reduce swelling.

Walking in a swimming pool, which will help you feel both lighter and cooler (win-win!), is also a good idea.

When should I be concerned by swelling in my feet during pregnancy?

Gradual swelling in your hands and feet is very common during pregnancy, and there’s usually no reason to worry.

Try some of the remedies above.

And remember that it won’t last forever.

But if you experience sudden or severe swelling in your feet, hands, or face, you should call your doctor straight away.

This might be a sign of preeclampsia, a high blood pressure condition that can be very dangerous to you and your baby.

Other preeclampsia symptoms include a bad headache, blurry vision, and severe pain below your ribs.

Most of the time, swollen hands and feet are par for the pregnancy course.

Hang in there, mama.

The swelling will start to go down a week or two after your little one is born.

And if you need support along the way, your Peanut community is here for you.

Popular on the blog
Trending in our community

Get the free app

Download on the App Store
Download on the Play Store
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest