Menopause

Progesterone Dosage for Menopause: What to Know

Team Peanut
Team Peanutabout 1 month ago4 min read

If you’re looking for relief from your menopause symptoms, you may be wondering about an effective progesterone dosage for menopause. We’ll take you through the details.

Progesterone Dosage for Menopause

If hot flashes are burning up your nights, you might be curious about what options are on the table for treating menopause symptoms.











Estrogen? Progesterone? A combo deal?

We’ll take you through the facts on the progesterone dosage for menopause and how to use hormone therapy safely.

Your next step will be to talk to your doctor about your options.

We all have different needs and come to the menopause party with different bodies.

So what may be right for one person is not necessarily right for another.

In this article: 📝

  • What even is progesterone?
  • How does menopausal hormone therapy work?
  • Progesterone dosage for menopause

What even is progesterone?

Progesterone has a bunch of essential functions in our reproductive health.

It helps prepare the uterus for pregnancy — and then supports that pregnancy if it happens.

It also has other jobs to do, including regulating our blood pressure and helping out with our mood and sleep.

As menopause nears, the production of progesterone and estrogen — the hormone that’s responsible for regulating our menstrual cycle — starts to decline.

When this happens, we may experience all sorts of uncomfortable symptoms, including the notorious heat surges called the hot flash.

For some women, menopause symptoms can be really debilitating, getting in the way of their quality of life and the sleep they need to function.

Enter menopausal hormone therapy (aka hormone replacement therapy).

It’s proven to be an effective treatment for the symptoms that can crop up at this time of life.

How does menopausal hormone therapy work?

Menopausal hormone therapy can help you smoothe out the hormone shifts that may be happening during this chapter of life.

There are two main types of menopausal hormone therapy available for the treatment of menopause symptoms. They are:

Estrogen-only therapy

Estrogen helps out with menopause symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness and reduces the risk of osteoporosis.

Estrogen-only therapy is often taken as a pill or a patch but can also come as a cream, spray, gel, or vaginal ring.

Estrogen and progestin (synthetic progesterone) therapy

If you haven’t had a hysterectomy (a procedure where your uterus is removed), you may be prescribed a combination of estrogen and progesterone.

That’s because estrogen on its own increases the risk of uterine cancer.

When added to the mix, progestin reduces this risk because it helps thin the lining of the uterus.

Estrogen-progestin therapy usually comes in pill form.

There are also patches available, but application through the skin doesn’t appear to provide enough protection against uterine cancer.

Progesterone dosage for menopause

The recommended dosage of progesterone is 200 mg a day for twelve consecutive days each month, or 100 mg daily.

Your doctor will discuss your options with you so you can make an informed decision about how best to proceed.

According to the North American Menopause Society, it’s best to take all menopausal hormone therapy in the lowest dose for the least amount of time.

Unfortunately, menopausal hormone therapy is not without its risks, including heart disease, stroke, blood clots, and breast cancer.

This is why it’s so vital to work with your healthcare provider to get the proper treatment for your needs.

Progesterone cream dosage for menopause

You may have also noticed the OTC progesterone creams on the market.

So, how effective are these? And are there any risks?

The claims made by the makers of these products are that they not only help treat menopause symptoms but also have other effects, like reducing the signs of aging on the skin.

And while some studies have proved promising in this area, more quality research is needed to see whether these creams actually work.

So basically, the science just isn’t there to back up the use of OTC products.

And administering hormone therapy without the guidance of your doctor isn’t advised.

(The FDA has flagged makers of these products for this reason.)

The bottom line here?

It’s best to stick with your doctor’s recommendations on any sort of menopausal hormone therapy rather than opting for OTC solutions.

We don’t have one-size-fits-all bodies that require the same treatment, and our risk factors are all different.

We know that this phase of life can be challenging for so many reasons.

We don’t have to do it alone.

Head over to Peanut.

We’re having the conversation.

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