How to Create Your Pumping and Breastfeeding Schedule

Team Peanut
Team Peanut2 months ago6 min read

Trying to come up with a pumping and breastfeeding schedule that works for you and your baby? Here’s how to combine the two.

Pumping and Breastfeeding Schedule

Feeling confused by pumping and breastfeeding schedules?

You’re not alone, mama.











Having a new baby comes with so many steep learning curves and adjustments.

And if you’re mixing breastfeeding and pumping, it can be hard to know where to even start.

So, from how often you should pump while breastfeeding to how to alternate between the two — we’ve got you.

Here’s what you need to know about creating a pumping and breastfeeding schedule that works for you and your little one.

In this article: 📝

  • How many times a day should I pump while breastfeeding?
  • What is a good schedule for breastfeeding and pumping?
  • How long should I wait to breastfeed after pumping?
  • How do you alternate between pumping and breastfeeding?
  • How to schedule pumping and breastfeeding: example schedules

How many times a day should I pump while breastfeeding?

Well, this mainly depends on your existing feeding schedule.

As a rule of thumb, whether you’re pumping or breastfeeding (or both), you should think about getting milk out between 8 and 10 times a day.

It’s all about supply and demand.

And if you keep your schedule even (and rather packed), you’re less likely to end up with under or over-supply issues.

The number of times you should pump while breastfeeding also depends on your reasons for pumping.

For instance:

  • If you’ve previously exclusively breastfed and are building up pumping gradually, think about starting just twice a day to get into a new routine.
  • If you’re pumping because you’re going to be away from your baby for extended periods (say, returning to work), then pumping every few hours will keep things going.
  • If you’re weaning or dealing with an oversupply of milk (which can lead to engorgement or conditions like mastitis), think about pumping after each breastfeeding session.

What is a good schedule for breastfeeding and pumping?

So, what is a good breastfeeding and pumping schedule?

The short answer?

One that works for you and your baby.

There’s absolutely no right and wrong here.

And there are no rules that are set in stone.

In general, it’s best to feed your baby first and pump second.

This ensures your little one always gets the nutrition they need.

You can then pump any excess milk afterward.

Milk removal (of whatever form) should happen roughly every 2 to 3 hours.

This prevents potential clogs from fatty milk and keeps the ducts and nipples flushed from things like yeast and bacteria that cause thrush and mastitis.

If you’re creating a pumping and breastfeeding schedule for newborns, always take time to reevaluate how your plan is working for you.

Newborns can easily nurse up to twelve times a day (basically round the clock!), which might feel like there isn’t much left for pumping at all.

Start pumping gradually, and work on building this up as needed.

While the number and timings of pumping sessions will depend on your lifestyle and baby’s feeding, pumping sessions should follow (somewhat) along with your regular feeding times and lengths.

Each feed/pump in the early days is usually around 15 to 20 minutes, but can be anywhere from 5 to 40 minutes!

How long should I wait to breastfeed after pumping?

It’s best to wait at least 30 minutes (preferably an hour) after pumping to allow your milk supplies to build up.

Breastfeeding can then continue as usual, ensuring plenty of milk for your baby.

But, if your baby wants to breastfeed right after pumping (and, as any mama knows, this can be the case) — this is absolutely fine too.

If you’re building up your milk supply, try pumping early in the morning.

Lots of mamas get the most milk first thing in the day, as feeding might be less frequent during the night.

It’s also common to struggle to pump after every feed.

Of course, this can make creating a schedule tricky.

In this case, pumping in the morning will also help.

It might just be a slight difference, but the volume of milk may increase over time.

How do you alternate between pumping and breastfeeding?

If you’ve already got a breastfeeding schedule in the bag, introducing pumping into the mix can feel like a big deal.

But it’s all about small steps here, mama.

For how to combine breastfeeding and pumping schedules, let your baby (and your own needs) set the pace.

What does this mean?

It’s all about allowing babies to feed on their schedule, even as you introduce pumping sessions.

In the early days, this will probably amount to feeding every two to three hours, with one feed at night.

Start by pumping after breastfeeding, slowly building this up.

If you’re going to be away from your baby and need to build up a stash, begin pumping for one or two sessions a day at least two weeks before you’ll need it.

This means you won’t have to suddenly alternate between exclusive breastfeeding and exclusive pumping — which can feel uncomfortable, especially if you’re new to pumping.

How to schedule pumping and breastfeeding: example schedules

With all this in mind, let’s explore what a pumping and breastfeeding schedule could look like.

Again, this will depend on your reasons for pumping and your existing breastfeeding schedule.

But here are a few possible scenarios:

Sample pumping and breastfeeding schedule: back to work

  • 6:00 am — Wake and pump
  • 6:45 am — Breastfeed baby
  • 9:00 am — Pump soon after arriving at work
  • 12:00 pm — Lunch and pump
  • 3:00 pm — Afternoon pump
  • 5:00 pm — Breastfeeding once back with baby

Sample pumping and breastfeeding schedule: newborn

  • 6:00 am — Wake and breastfeed
  • 7:00 am — Pump
  • 9:00 am — Breastfeed
  • 12:00 pm — Lunchtime breastfeed
  • 1:00 pm — Pump
  • 3:00 pm — Breastfeed
  • 6:00 pm — Evening breastfeeds as needed
  • 10:00 pm — Nighttime pump

Sample pumping and breastfeeding schedule: building supply

  • 6:00 am — Wake and pump
  • 6:45 am — Breastfeed
  • 9:00 am — Breastfeed
  • 11:00 am — Pump
  • 1:00 pm — Lunchtime breastfeed
  • 3:00 pm — Breastfeed
  • 4:00 pm — Pump (if possible)
  • 6:00pm — Evening breastfeed or pump (as needed)
  • 10:00pm — Nighttime pump

Remember, these examples are only meant to be one way a pumping and breastfeeding schedule might work.

Every single mama and baby combo has unique needs and tendencies, so it’s all about finding a rhythm and routine that works for you.

Don’t be scared to change and adapt as you go.

However you decide to work it, you’ve got this, mama.

And if you need support along the way, your Peanut community is here for you.

Join us.

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