Pregnancy

Red Bull While Pregnant: Is it Okay to Drink?

Team Peanut25 days ago4 min read

Can you drink Red Bull when pregnant? The truth is that it’s not really recommended.

Red Bull While Pregnant

Thanks to sky-high sugar content and lots of caffeine, energy drinks like Red Bull, Monster, Rockstar, and G Fuel aren’t the best things to be drinking while pregnant.

In fact, many of them actually put a warning on their labels that advises against drinking them during pregnancy.

Here’s what you need to know about drinking Red Bull while pregnant.

What happens if I drink energy drinks while pregnant?

Truthfully, we don’t really know what happens if you drink energy drinks such as Red Bull while pregnant.

That’s because every energy drink has a different list of ingredients. And the serious concern here is that they’re not regulated by the FDA, which means they might even contain ingredients that aren’t mentioned on the label.

But, if you’ve just got to the bottom of a can, don’t panic. It’s best to avoid any more for now, but it’s unlikely that one drink will cause you or your baby any harm.

Here’s what we do know about what energy drinks contain:

The problems with energy drinks

  • High caffeine levels. Part of the “energy” that energy drinks claim to give you comes from caffeine. Too much caffeine can raise your blood pressure, make you irritable and nervous, and affect your sleep. There’s also a small chance that it may increase the risk of pregnancy loss. Doctors recommend limiting caffeine to 200mg per day during pregnancy. In real terms, an 8oz cup of coffee has 80 to 100mg of caffeine. A standard energy drink can have as much as 250mg of caffeine. Even more concerning? Energy drinks in the U.S. don’t generally have the amount of caffeine they contain printed on the can.
  • Sugar. Sugar is the other main source of energy in energy drinks. And there’s lots of it. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, the average energy drink has more sugar than a 12oz cola. Meanwhile, the American Heart Association estimates that one 8oz energy drink has more sugar than your entire recommended daily intake. The bottom line is that a diet high in sugar isn’t great either for you or your baby. It can increase the risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and birth differences.
  • Other ingredients. Some energy drinks contain B vitamins and herbs like ginseng and guarana, which are often sold as health supplements. These herbs should be used “with caution” during pregnancy, according to medical studies. While B vitamins can be beneficial, it’s possible that a high dose could cause side effects.

Do energy drinks cause birth defects?

We’ll say it again: if you’ve already had an energy drink or Red Bull during pregnancy, don’t worry.

A single energy drink is unlikely to cause any problems.

However, the evidence does suggest that too much caffeine can increase the chances of birth differences and other complications.

One recent study found that pregnant women who regularly drank energy drinks were almost twice as likely to experience a stillbirth.

It’s difficult to conduct thorough medical studies on the effects of any substances during pregnancy, and the risk is still very small.

All the same, you might still choose to avoid the risk by leaving energy drinks off your pregnancy menu.

What energy drinks are safe during pregnancy?

Unfortunately, the answer is really none. No energy drinks have been proven safe during pregnancy.

Red Bull while pregnant: The bottom line

Is Red Bull bad for you when pregnant? Well, it’s certainly not recommended.

Thanks to the high caffeine and sugar levels in energy drinks, they’re best avoided during pregnancy.

For the moment, a glass of orange juice or a mug of herbal tea is a safer way to rehydrate and get a natural energy boost.

More on what to drink during pregnancy:
Can You Drink Wine While Pregnant?
Is Orange Juice Good for Pregnancy?
Can You Drink Green Tea While Pregnant?
Can You Drink Chamomile Tea While Pregnant?
Can You Drink Coffee While Pregnant?
How Much Water to Drink When Pregnant?