Motherhood

Tooth Fairy Letter Templates: What to Write

Team Peanut
Team Peanut5 months ago8 min read

Of all the things we never learned in school, writing a tooth fairy letter is one of them. That’s okay. We’re here to help.

Tooth Fairy Letter Templates

If you’ve just realized that you may have to do some dirty work for a certain dental delight, take a deep breath.











Let’s be real — putting yourself in the tiny shoes of a little winged creature is not the easiest thing in the world.

Writing a tooth fairy letter wasn’t exactly a class you had to pass at school. Don’t worry. We’re here to help.

We’re going to give you some tooth fairy note ideas as well as take you through the 101s of this elusive little sprite.

Let’s get started. 🧚

In this article 📝

  • What is the tooth fairy?
  • Does the Tooth Fairy leave a note?
  • How do you write a letter to the Tooth Fairy?
  • What do I write in the Tooth Fairy note?
  • Tooth fairy names
  • How do you answer what the Tooth Fairy does with teeth?

What is the tooth fairy?

The tooth fairy has a good thing going.

They pick up teeth from under the pillows of little children — teeth that these children probably don’t have much other use for now that they’re out.

An upcycling project? A recycling initiative?

While we can’t be 100% sure, it does seem to be a great service that they provide.

So, how does their business really operate?

Do they leave a note along with the odd polished trinket or coin? If so, what do these letters actually say?

Does the Tooth Fairy leave a note?

The reality is, there are many kinds of tooth fairies in the world.

Some leave a note, some leave a shiny coin, and some leave both.

Life gets busy, and sometimes between work, social, and family commitments, it can be a real stretch to do the tooth fairy’s bidding too.

One big positive of leaving a note from the tooth fairy is that it can be a great way to get excited about the big teeth that are on their way.

And excitement about those new dental additions may also mean excitement about looking after them.

So with all that in mind, where do you even begin?

How do you write a letter to the Tooth Fairy?

You know your child the best. You know what makes them giggle, what makes them feel special — and what they might expect in return for so kind an offering as their magic teeth.

So our first bit of advice is to make it personal.

If you can pop in any secrets that make them feel extra special, even better.

(I was flying over when I saw you lose your tooth at Granny’s house.)

Then, make it age-appropriate.

While you may want to write a creative essay, your seven-year-old may be happier with a quick note that they can read out loud themselves.

Also, if those creative juices are flowing, now’s the time to use that fuel.

Cut out your letter in the shape of the tooth.

Make a special stamp that is the tooth fairy’s signature.

Use color, glitter, sparkles, fun, flair.

This can truly be as fun for you as it is for them.

And don’t worry if you’re not sure what to say. We’ll help you through this.

What do I write in the Tooth Fairy note?

Here are four templates for a letter from the tooth fairy, all for different situations:

1. First tooth!

Kids usually lose their first tooth somewhere around the age of five or six.

This is also around the time when they are starting to read.

Ah, perfect match!

Writing a letter that they can read themselves is the ideal combo of educational and fun.

You might want to try something like:

Dear [NAME],

Thank you so much for giving me your lovely tooth.

Look after your big teeth just like you’ve looked after your little ones.

See you again soon.

Love,
The Tooth Fairy

2. Stamped by the Official Tooth Committee.

If you’re into it, this one requires a little design work.

Create a certificate that says something along the lines of:

This is to certify that [NAME] is the proud producer of one beautiful pearly white tooth.

Tooth lost at: [PLACE]

Tooth lost on: [DATE]

Thanks to your hard work and dedication, we have a new building block for our fairy palace.

Signed,
The Tooth Fairy

3. I found your new home!

If you’ve just moved house, this is ideal.

And it can work just as well if a tooth falls out while visiting a grandparent or while away on holiday.

Dear [NAME],

I’m so glad I found you! A little fairy friend of mine showed me the way to your new home. What a fun place to lose your tooth in. Congratulations!

Thank you so much for the beautiful tooth you have given me. In exchange, please accept this note.

I know that I will see you again soon. In the meantime, don’t forget to brush at least twice a day. You’ve got some precious pearls there.

Kind regards,
T. Fairy

3. For lost property

Pull this on out (‘scuse the pun) in the instance of a tooth being lost before it can make its way under the pillow.

Luckily, tooth fairies are pretty smart when it comes to finding the owners of missing teeth.

Dear [NAME],
You’ll be pleased to know that I found your teeth at [INSERT LOCATION]. It’s beautiful!

I would like to take it back to my fairy queendom. In exchange for this excellent piece, I offer you this shiny paper money.

Please continue to take such exceptional care of your lovely teeth.

See you again soon!

Best wishes,
The Tooth Fairy

And finally, if you need a little help when it comes to answering those tricky questions, we’ve got you covered:

Tooth fairy names

Want to give your tooth fairy a name?

How about these magical tooth fairy names:

  • Fairy Bluebell
  • Fossette (it means “small cavity” in French)
  • Puck
  • Fae or Fay
  • Tinkerbell
  • Nissa (a Scandinavian word meaning “fairy”)
  • Fayette (meaning “small fairy” in French)
  • Tande (which means “teeth” in Afrikaans)
  • Zuby (meaning “teeth” in Belarusian, Ukrainian, and Russian)
  • Yáchǐ (a Chinese word meaning “teeth”)
  • Niho (Hawaiian for “teeth”)
  • Fiacla (the Irish word for “teeth”)
  • Tönn ævintýri (the Icelandic word for “tooth fairy”)
  • Tannfe or Tandfe (the Norwegian and Swedish names for tooth fairy)
  • Zahnfee (the German, Swiss, and Austrian tooth fairy)
  • Ratoncito Perez (the Hispanic mouse version of the tooth fairy)
  • Souris (French for “mouse”, since, in France, the tooth fairy is also a mouse)

How do you answer what the Tooth Fairy does with teeth?

Yep, a fair percentage of mamahood is knowing how to answer some very difficult questions.

And before you head over to the birds and the bees, most of these have to do with the day-to-day existence of mythical creatures.

If you’re struggling to figure out an appropriate answer for this complicated question of what the tooth fairy does with all those teeth, here are some possibilities:

  • Teeth are the bricks to build a queendom / home / amusement park for fairies. Your teeth are finding their way to a magical palace.
  • What do you think stars are made of?
  • They need them for babies who don’t have any teeth yet.
  • Each tooth is ground down to make fairy dust. Next time you make a wish, that’s where the magic will come from.

And if you want to use this as an educational opportunity:

  • They are taken to dentists who use them to help people who need dentures. (This can be followed up with some exploration of what the mouth looks like and where each tooth lives.)

In reality? Well, the idea of exchanging teeth for money has a complicated history.

There has long been a European tradition of tand-fe (or tooth fee) where money was given in exchange for a baby tooth.

Children’s teeth may have also been used to offer protection — as well as bring good luck to Vikings in battle.

And predating the tooth fairy is an adorable tooth mouse.

The tooth fairy themself? They seem to have hit the scene a little more recently.

While we don’t know for sure how long the tooth fairy may have existed within different families, public references date back to the early twentieth century.

And in writing? Well, that appears to have happened when Esther Watkins Arnold wrote a playlet called The Tooth Fairy in the 1920s.

While this magical creature is still quite new on the scene, they’ve definitely made an impact.

And mamas have been helping them do so for decades.

🦷 More from The 411:
10 Life-Changing Mom Hacks From Peanut Mamas
How to Save for a Baby: 10 Money-Saving Tips & Tricks
When Do Babies Start Teething?
What is a Baby Teeth Chart and How Does it Work?
How Long Does Teething Last?
12 Easy Baby Teething Remedies
Can Teething Cause Vomiting?
How To Soothe A Teething Baby At Night
A Quick Guide to Teething Poop & Diarrhea
What are the Best Teething Foods?
Baby Ear Infection vs. Teething: How to Spot the Difference

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