C
2 years ago

Why we (lactation consultants!) recommend NOT to pump before 6 weeks!

We tend to see a lot of push back (to say the least) when we advise moms on waiting until after six weeks to pump. Again, like with many things, you'll see that we do our best to advise and make recommendations from a fact and evidence-based standpoint. At the end of the day, what we want to provide you with is knowledge. There are exceptions here. We understand that everyone is in a different situation. Here are a few exceptions in which there would be a need to pump prior to six weeks. - Exclusively pumping. Of course, this is obvious! - Early return to work. Mothers who return to work prior to 6 weeks. This is more in regards to getting baby to take a bottle and being pace fed. We understand wanting to ensure that your baby will take a bottle while you are away, especially, if you are returning to work early. However, you may also want to explore syringe feeding. This exception is not so much for building a stash as you really only need to pump enough for the next day. 2-3 days is my personal recommendation. Even with this, you want to go as long as you can without pumping. - Medical situations that make it necessary to pump early - this could be a variety of things. - Mom’s mental health being negatively affected by nursing such as a severe aversion. Why we recommend waiting until after six weeks to pump: - Risk of oversupply. This causes engorging and mastitis at worst. - Interruption of allowing baby to naturally regulate your supply - Missed opportunities for your body to read what your baby needs. When you nurse directly, your body “reads” baby’s saliva and will produce exactly what they need. - Experiencing pain or discomfort from fullness or engorging is not a reason to pump. In fact, it can make things worse and or is the cause. Hand express for relief. What can also happen is lactose overload. With that can come potential weight gain/tummy/reflux issues as baby will not be talking in enough hindmilk which is higher fat. Foremilk is lower in fat and calories. These are NOT two types of milk, but rather the gradual change of fat content in milk when nursing/pumping. Reasons not to pump prior to six weeks - Building a stash. This is a misconception. You do not need a freezer full of milk. - To bring in your milk. Delivery of your placenta is what triggers your body to make milk. Nursing on demand, is how you get your milk to come in. - Assumption that baby isn’t getting enough...5-6+ wet diapers and weight gain are your indicators that baby is getting enough. Baby wanting to nurse often is cluster feeding. That place a major role in your milk coming in. It doesn’t mean you have a low supply or that baby isn’t getting enough. - Having someone else, like dad/your partner feed baby. This can actually cause more work for you. Who’s sterilizing those pump parts while dad is giving a bottle? Probably you...😫 There are plenty of ways the other parent can bond with baby and help you... Skin to skin while singing, reading and rocking baby. These things encourage bonding and help baby recognize their other parent as a safe space. Taking baby while you rest Cooking Household chores like dishes and laundry Bathing baby Literally soooo many things
Why we (lactation consultants!) recommend NOT to pump before 6 weeks!

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6 months ago

My boy is only 1 week 1day old and he doesn't eat every 2-3 hrs but he definitely have 5-6+ wet diapers he loves to sleep but when he does wake to eat he definitely eats.... is it okay for him to go more than 2-3 hours without feeding

1 year ago

I didn’t realize pumping before 6 weeks wasn’t a good thing! I may be the odd one but with me pumping once at night right before a feeding and dad feeding him saves my sanity 😫 dad does wash everything after. I have had issues with little man fighting me to latch though

1 year ago

Great information. Thank you. One question though, why do hospitals make it such a big deal to BF and pump immediately afterwards? My milk supply has definitely came in baby js loving every ounce but why do they make it such a huge deal to pump as well? I was getting so stressed out trying to find a pump on day 1 of beingong her home so this makes me so relieved. I’m happy I am able to feed her exclusively with my breast :)

1 reply

1 year ago

@Victoria Bc women are often being advised by people who have no business advising moms on breastfeeding. Doctors, nurses, midwives are not trained in lactation, but often advise on it rather than referring moms to LCs/IBCLCs. If your nurse, doc, etc is formerly trained and certified in lactation, they should let you know.

2 years ago

@Chanel @Lauren ok I can certainly understand that. Regarding the feelings of anxiety seeing other women’s stashes -absolutely yes. I have been observed by 3 different LCs and I am one of those unfortunate women who cannot produce enough milk for no recognized medical reason. I initially watched many YouTube videos looking for guidance but always came away feeling more inadequate than enlightened after seeing all the women touting the gallons of milk that they had stashed. I stopped watching those videos. Same reason I stopped watching the Victoria Secrets fashion show....

2 replies

2 years ago

🥰

Farmington Hills, Michigan, US
2 years ago

The Victoria fashion show models should watch YOU and be jealous of YOU I think you are gorgeous mamma! I wish I had seen this earlier so I could have told you over video conference when I saw you. I'm sorry you are struggling, but your determination is admirable! I hope that's a feature your daughter gets from you. You can tell your story to your children when they get to be an adult and they can look at you and see your strength and love!

2 years ago

@Chanel. Why do you say that a feeezer stash is not needed?

4 replies

2 years ago

At most, I’d say stash for 3 days.

2 years ago

Sure! There is a major misconception that moms need to build an insane stash in order to provide for their babes once they return to work or are away from their babies. The idea of building a huge stash pushes a very stressful narrative and typically women are not thoroughly informed that their babies only need 1-1.5 oz per hour and that filling a deep freezer is not necessary. We don’t allow stash pics for these reasons as well. Those kinds of posts typically leave moms feeling as if they aren’t adequately providing for their babies and that something is wrong with their supply. It invokes feelings of inadequacy an anxiety. We don’t want that. Those posts almost always come with “drink body armor, drink this tea” or the like which is misinformation in regards to building a supply.

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