Team Peanut
New York City, New York, US
1 year ago

Introducing, the #RenamingRevolution Glossary! 📕

In an effort to shine a light on the outdated terminology that women experience throughout fertility and motherhood, we started a viral campaign called the #RenamingRevolution. Thousands of you to came forward to share the hurtful terms you’ve experienced first-hand, like incompetent cervix, geriatric pregnancy, and spontaneous abortion (yes, these words were still being used in 2021!). It was clear to us that something needed to change. So today, we’re announcing the launch of the #RenamingRevolution Glossary. With help from linguists and medical professionals, this glossary aims to redefine the negatively-charged terms that are too often used during the most sensitive and vulnerable times in women’s lives. To check it out, tap the link below. ⬇️  https://www.peanut-app.io/blog/renaming-revolution-glossary We can’t wait to hear what you think!
Introducing, the #RenamingRevolution Glossary! 📕

Show your support

1 year ago

The one that didn’t sit well with me was “Birther” instead of “Birth Mom.” I can see how “Birth Mom” could make the list... but “Birther” makes me think of farm stock. 🐄🐖🐑🐓Otherwise, I could really see the benefit of changing some, others didn’t cause concern for me, but trying to put myself in other’s shoes...

1 reply

1 year ago

I think that’s maybe just a suggested term for ppl who might want a gender neutral approach. If ppl want to keep saying birth mom for their own experiences then of course they have every right to. I just think it’s good to be mindful that sometimes words that fit our experiences won’t fit the experiences of others so if they want to call it something else that’s cool too. As a non binary person I appreciated the inclusion of a gender neutral term. Personally I use birth parent rather than birther but it was nice to feel like I had a place at the table too. I think some of these terms work well as suggestions on how to enter conversations neutrally for other people. It’s like when I’m chatting with someone who’s pregnant that I’ve just met. I like to go in neutrally first “wow you must be so excited that in a few months you’ll get to be a parent! 😍” giving a cue for them to either say “yes, I’ve wanted to be a mom for so long” or accept “parent”.

1 year ago

The truth is for loss or deviation from what you expected in birth, any differences will echo as painful. The words don't matter though the connotation contributes. The word choice here doesn't change the reality of what happened. Focusing on changing the vernacular of medical field is not as important as changing our own perceptions about birth or having babies through education and experience.

1 year ago

@Angelica I use bitch in a positive way all the time so ya I’m familiar with word stigma. I think we all are 🙃

1 reply

1 year ago

Not everyone uses it that way nor does it feel empowering to do so in many cases. So perhaps start a new campaign to destigmatize? Doesn’t mean we can’t do both. Edit: looking at the original message, I realize that they said some of these terms were bothersome or carried a negative connotation. I now see what you mean. I’ve never tied anything negative to stay at home or working mother titles. Child carer bothered me more for the poor grammar than anything.

1 year ago

@Angelica they said stay at home mom in the guide. I said stay at home parent. Not everyone is so gender strict.

1 year ago

Yikes... some ppl get really angry and stressed when they realise that the current terminology doesn’t suit everybody 😬 Like... if you don’t need terms to change then keep on using what works for you but maybe just be a bit less volatile over some ppl wanting different language. Their experiences don’t change yours so don’t try to devalue theirs when they want to use different words to explain something 🤷‍♂️ some of the ideas for possible new terms work for me, some don’t, but whatever ppl wanna use to describe their journey is fine by me because it’s their experience not mine... so instead of mocking or attacking people who find this glossary useful, maybe just go “you know what? They can do them, I can do me. That’s fine.” 👌

11 replies

1 year ago

Shaming? It seemed more like they were just proudly announcing coming up with alternatives for ppl who would like them and don’t feel certain language adequately reflects their experiences therefore aleviating any emotional discomfort they may have felt with some of the terminology currently used. If ppl feel comfortable with the current terminology then they can just carry on using it but for some ppl it’s not appropriate or helpful.

Peoria, Arizona, US
1 year ago

Ok but if they want to change the words why does there need to be an announcement somewhat shaming people and making it uncomfortable to continue using those words

Read more on Peanut

Get the free app

Download on the App Store
Download on the Playstore
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest